Week 45: Monday – Food that Nourishes the Body and Soul

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“We work to eat. We work four hours before we eat. If we do not work, we do not eat.” –Canaan Farm Principle

“Finally, brothers and sisters, whatever is true, whatever is noble, whatever is right, whatever is pure, whatever is lovely, whatever is admirable—if anything is excellent or praiseworthy—think about such things. Whatever you have learned or received or heard from me, or seen in me—put it into practice.And the God of peace will be with you.” – Philippians 4:8-9

In his book The Warrior Diet, Ori Hofmekler pointed out that there are two kinds of instincts when it comes to eating.

First is The Hunter’s instinct. Hunters, Ori said, “work in order to get their food. They make a selection. They know exactly what they are after… They eat only when hungry. They have a sense of priority –and a sense of time… he’ll tear it apart, taking the best chunk and run with it to a safe place to eat. When necessary, he’ll fight for the first bite. Hunters/ predators like to eat when it is safe and they can relax. Some animals, like wolves or mountain lions, will take the food, bury it, and come back at night (when it’s safe) to dig it out. Their instincts are sharp.” 

The second instinct is The Scavenger’s. “Scavenger is exactly the opposite. While hunters work hard to get their food, scavengers don’t. They pick leftovers. While hunters have a sense of priority and know exactly what they need, scavengers have no sense of priority. While hunters will make a selection, choosing their food, scavengers eat whatever is available. While hunters eat only when hungry, scavengers eat all the time. While hunters eat warm, fresh, live food, the scavengers often eat cold and dead food. While hunters like to eat when it’s safe and they can relax, scavengers ‘eat on the go’… A scavenger will pick up any food, not knowing its nutritional value or where it came from, nor care if it is fresh, and eat it –for the sake of eating.”

I have always been a food lover. And before reading Hofmekler’s book and all the lectures I’ve attended about wellness, I most of the time did not mind whether I know the name of the food in front of me or not, or whatever sustenance my active body would get. As long as it gets along well with my taste buds, I’ll eat it! (I know, I was a Scavenger!) And who said that eating is wrong? Nobody. I need it, we need it, our body needs it. Then, what makes “Scavenging” wrong? Hofmekler’s answer, “When you eat just for the sake of eating.”

Eating can be harmful. In fact, studies show that the common cause of chronic diseases, which by the way is one of the leading killers on earth, is our unhealthy habit of eating.

Video Clip of Ori Hofmekler’s interview:

We enjoy and love eating so much that we forget the purpose of why we are doing it. Most of the times, we become so captivated by the irresistible sight, smell, and taste of the food served for us not knowing the facts about its nutritional values. Then, we are surprised when the doctor tells us that we are sick. And if we are to trace it, it all goes down to how we actually fed and took care of our body in the past years.

Same goes with our Spiritual life. It needs proper nutrition in order to be healthy. As Christians, we are not to be like the Scavengers who just pick the leftovers and take in whatever the world has to offer.

We are made Hunters, and we should be sharp to distinguish what is well for our body and soul. We hunt for the best chunk. We don’t read just for the sake of reading, we read to learn. We don’t study just for the sake of studying, but we study to understand. We don’t pray just for the sake of praying, we pray to be changed. We don’t eat just for the sake of eating, we eat to work. We don’t work just for the sake of working, we work to serve others. We live not just for the sake of living, but we live with a purpose.

Paul is right to remind us that: “…whatever is true, whatever is noble, whatever is right, whatever is pure, whatever is lovely, whatever is admirable—if anything is excellent or praiseworthy—think about such things. Whatever you have learned or received or heard from me, or seen in me—put it into practice. And the God of peace will be with you.” –Philippians 4:8-9

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