WEEK 30: Tuesday

Tuesday

DAY 2

“The biggest communication problem is we do not listen to understand. We listen to reply.” – Zig Ziglar

 

He who guards his mouth and his tongue keeps himself from troubles. – Proverbs 21:23 (AMP)

 


 

It is a sad thing to know that it’s always the people that we know the least that we judge more often.

 

Zig Ziglar said this correctly:

“The biggest communication problem is we do not listen to understand. We listen to reply.”

 

Listen to the words of Job’s friends to him as they saw his sufferings.

 

Stop and think! Have you ever known a truly good and innocent person who was punished? Experience teaches that it is those who sow sin and trouble who harvest the same.” – Job 4:7-8 (TLB)

 

“My advice to you is this: Go to God and confess your sins to him.For he does wonderful miracles, marvels without number. He sends the rain upon the earth to water the fields, and gives prosperity to the poor and humble, and takes sufferers to safety.” – Job 5:8-11(TLB)

 

So God didn’t hesitate to rebuke them:

 

“I am angry with you and with your two friends, for you have not been right in what you have said about me, as my servant Job was.” – Job 42:7 (TLB)

 

When we see others suffer, do we say without thinking that the reason for their sufferings is because of the sins they are hiding?

Let’s be watchful of our words.

 

He who guards his mouth and his tongue keeps himself from troubles. – Proverbs 21:23 (AMP)

Gordon Fee tells the story of a Sunday school teacher who wanted to present the historical situation of the parable of the Pharisee and tax collector in which a Pharisee prayed, “I thank you, God, that I am not like other people, robbers, evildoers, adulterers or even like this tax collector.” For a whole hour this teacher exposed all the things that the Pharisees of the first century were doing wrong. But as he finished his report, he ended by praying, “Thank you, Lord, that we are not like the Pharisee in this story.” Our response is to laugh at the Sunday school teacher. But be careful to respond with the same prayer: “Thank God that we are not like this Sunday school teacher!”

 

Words are very powerful. When psychologists Cliff Nortarius and Howard Markman studied newlyweds over the first decade of marriage, they discovered that couples who stayed together uttered 5 or fewer put-downs in every 100 comments to each other. But couples who inflicted twice as many verbal wounds –  10 or more putdowns out of every 100 comments – later split up.

 

How do we keep ourselves from troubles by guarding our mouths and tongues? Remember GIGOGarbage in, Garbage out.

 

Cultivate good things in your heart and good things will also flow with what you say.

 

A Chinese proverb says: “If there is righteousness in the heart, there will be beauty in the character. If there is beauty in the character, there will be harmony in the home. If there is harmony in the home, there will be order in the nation. If there is order in the nation, there will be peace in the world.”

 

 

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